IDC seminar – BCS-HCI practice talks

July 5, 2016 at 11:00 am

More details to come.

IDC seminar – SenseMap: Supporting Browser-based Sensemaking through Analytic Provenance

June 28, 2016 at 11:00 am

Phong Nguyen, PhD student with IDC

Phong Sensemaking is described as the process of comprehension, finding meaning and gaining insight from information, producing new knowledge and informing further action. Very often, users get lost when solving a complicated task using a big dataset over a long period of exploration and analysis. They may forget what they have done, are not aware of where they are in the context of the overall task, and do not know where to continue. In this paper, we introduce a tool, SenseMap, to address these issues in the context of browser-based online sensemaking. We conducted a semi-structured interview with nine participants to explore how they search, manage, and synthesize online information for their daily work activities. This was followed by a series of design workshops to walk the user scenarios, generate design questions, and formulate solutions relating to user interactions, tool features and manifestation. A simplified model based on Pirolli and Card’s sensemaking model is derived to better represent the browser behaviors we found and to guide the development of design requirements: users iteratively collect information sources relevant to the task, curate them in a way that makes sense, and finally communicate the findings to others. SenseMap automatically captures a user’s sensemaking actions, i.e., analytic provenance, and provides multi-linked views to visualize and curate the collected information, and communicate the findings. To explore how SenseMap is used, we conducted a user study in a naturalistic work setting with five participants completing the same sensemaking task related to their daily work activities. Most of the participants found the tool intuitive to use. It helped them to organize information sources, to quickly navigate to the sources they wanted, and enabled them to effectively communicate their findings. A process model is also derived based on both quantitative and qualitative data analysis.

IDC seminar – Enabling Provenance on the Web: Standardization and Research Questions

June 21, 2016 at 11:00 am

Professor Luc Moreau,

Head of the Web and Internet Science group (WAIS),

Department of Electronics and Computer Science (ECS), University of Southampton.

luc_smallProvenance is a record that describes the people, institutions, entities, and activities, involved in producing, influencing, or delivering a piece of data or a thing in the world.

Some 10 years after beginning research on the topic of provenance, I co-chaired the provenance working group at the World Wide Web Consortium. The working group published the PROV standard for provenance in 2013.

In this talk, I will present some use cases for provenance, the PROV standard and some flagship examples of adoption. I will then move on to our current research area aiming to exploit provenance, in the context of the Sociam, SmartSociety, ORCHID, EBook projects. Doing so, I will present techniques to deal with large scale provenance, to build predictive models based on provenance, and to analyse
provenance. I will also discuss how provenance can help with reproducibility, in the context of scientific workflows developed for qualitative analysis in social sciences.

Bio

Luc Moreau is a Professor of Computer Science and Head of the Web and Internet Science group (WAIS), in the department Electronics and Computer Science (ECS) at the University of Southampton.

Luc was co-chair of the W3C Provenance Working Group, which resulted in four W3C Recommendations and nine W3C Notes, specifying PROV, a conceptual data model for provenance the Web, and its serializations in various Web languages. Previously, he initiated the successful Provenance Challenge series, which saw the involvement of over 20 institutions investigating provenance inter-operability in 3 successive challenges, and which resulted in the specification of the community Open Provenance Model (OPM).

IDC Seminar – THE IMPACT OF BIG DATA ON FINANCIAL MANAGE-MENT WITHIN ORGANIZATIONS: A SYSTEMATIC LITERATURE REVIEW

June 14, 2016 at 11:00 am

Dr Sophie Cockcroft, University of Queensland,  Australia

sophie-cockcroft-editedInformation Systems to support the finance and accounting function within organisations form the backbone of modern commerce. Big data has brought a transformational change to this research space the effects of which are starting to be felt in industry and academia. This paper examines the potential research opportunities for the use of “Big Data” in accounting and finance research.  We examine existing accounting and finance literature to identify the current research approaches. An analysis is presented of 25 accounting and finance journals from 2009-2014 to identify key themes emerging. These are presented as a taxonomy and explored by means of this taxonomy

Bio

Sophie teaches and researches in Information Systems at the University of Queensland Business School. Her teaching interests include Business Intelligence and Analytics. With other colleagues in the business school she is exploring the use of big data in finance, sport, health and other applications. She has previously worked at the University of Otago (New Zealand) and City University of Hong Kong.

IDC seminar on Co-design by Marianne Markowski (2 short talks)

March 22, 2016 at 11:00 am

Dr. Marianne Markowski

Marianne_Markowski2Short talk 1: Co-design, collaborative design or participatory design?

My short talk explores the different interpretations of the word co-design and how it can be understood in different contexts. The perspectives range from HCI, systems design, participatory design to innovative and transformative design perspectives. I further offer a view on the applicability of co-design from a UX practitioner perspective  and my personal definition of co-design, which I developed as a researcher researching with older people.

Short talk 2: Cross-disciplinary views of affective experiences through research skills development

This short talk constitutes a work-in-progress report of our activities in knowledge and skills development when examining affective experiences in online and offlinecultural encounters. The presentation will engage with the different understandings of disciplinary viewpoints around the topic and argue that ‘affective experiences’ are understood and researched in very diverse ways.

Bio

Marianne Markowski has recently completed her PhD studies into designing online social interaction for and with older people. Her practice-based investigation looked at design processes as well as creative design practice (e.g. Teletalker prototype). With her research she explored different forms of participant and researcher engagements.

She currently works as a freelance UX designer and researcher before joining University of Greenwich’s Centre for Positive Ageing as a research fellow.

Alongside academia Marianne has been working in user experience design and user research for over a decade. She has evaluated a wide range of software and platforms starting from kiosk, desktop, interactive television to mobile applications and handsets. She led and worked on UX projects B2C and B2B in the retail, banking, education, mobile and government sectors.