Archive June 2016

IDC seminar – Enabling Provenance on the Web: Standardization and Research Questions

Professor Luc Moreau,

Head of the Web and Internet Science group (WAIS),

Department of Electronics and Computer Science (ECS), University of Southampton.

luc_smallProvenance is a record that describes the people, institutions, entities, and activities, involved in producing, influencing, or delivering a piece of data or a thing in the world.

Some 10 years after beginning research on the topic of provenance, I co-chaired the provenance working group at the World Wide Web Consortium. The working group published the PROV standard for provenance in 2013.

In this talk, I will present some use cases for provenance, the PROV standard and some flagship examples of adoption. I will then move on to our current research area aiming to exploit provenance, in the context of the Sociam, SmartSociety, ORCHID, EBook projects. Doing so, I will present techniques to deal with large scale provenance, to build predictive models based on provenance, and to analyse
provenance. I will also discuss how provenance can help with reproducibility, in the context of scientific workflows developed for qualitative analysis in social sciences.

Bio

Luc Moreau is a Professor of Computer Science and Head of the Web and Internet Science group (WAIS), in the department Electronics and Computer Science (ECS) at the University of Southampton.

Luc was co-chair of the W3C Provenance Working Group, which resulted in four W3C Recommendations and nine W3C Notes, specifying PROV, a conceptual data model for provenance the Web, and its serializations in various Web languages. Previously, he initiated the successful Provenance Challenge series, which saw the involvement of over 20 institutions investigating provenance inter-operability in 3 successive challenges, and which resulted in the specification of the community Open Provenance Model (OPM).

 

Visitor: Dr Sophie Cockcroft, University of Queensland

sophie

Dr Sophie Cockcroft was visiting the IDC in the week June 13-17 from the University of Queensland Business School in Brisbane Australia. She spent some time discussing methods used in literature reviews with research students and the pitfalls around writing them. She presented emerging work on a literature review she is working on relating to Big Data in Financial Management. During her time here she also built on this to with Professor William Wong, Dr Sylvia Gottschalk and Celeste Groenewald to come up with a concept for a project for visualising data on liquidity and value of specific contracts in credit risk modelling.

IDC Seminar – THE IMPACT OF BIG DATA ON FINANCIAL MANAGE-MENT WITHIN ORGANIZATIONS: A SYSTEMATIC LITERATURE REVIEW

Dr Sophie Cockcroft, University of Queensland,  Australia

sophie-cockcroft-editedInformation Systems to support the finance and accounting function within organisations form the backbone of modern commerce. Big data has brought a transformational change to this research space the effects of which are starting to be felt in industry and academia. This paper examines the potential research opportunities for the use of “Big Data” in accounting and finance research.  We examine existing accounting and finance literature to identify the current research approaches. An analysis is presented of 25 accounting and finance journals from 2009-2014 to identify key themes emerging. These are presented as a taxonomy and explored by means of this taxonomy

Bio

Sophie teaches and researches in Information Systems at the University of Queensland Business School. Her teaching interests include Business Intelligence and Analytics. With other colleagues in the business school she is exploring the use of big data in finance, sport, health and other applications. She has previously worked at the University of Otago (New Zealand) and City University of Hong Kong.