IDC seminar – Enabling Provenance on the Web: Standardization and Research Questions

June 21, 2016 at 11:00 am

Professor Luc Moreau,

Head of the Web and Internet Science group (WAIS),

Department of Electronics and Computer Science (ECS), University of Southampton.

luc_smallProvenance is a record that describes the people, institutions, entities, and activities, involved in producing, influencing, or delivering a piece of data or a thing in the world.

Some 10 years after beginning research on the topic of provenance, I co-chaired the provenance working group at the World Wide Web Consortium. The working group published the PROV standard for provenance in 2013.

In this talk, I will present some use cases for provenance, the PROV standard and some flagship examples of adoption. I will then move on to our current research area aiming to exploit provenance, in the context of the Sociam, SmartSociety, ORCHID, EBook projects. Doing so, I will present techniques to deal with large scale provenance, to build predictive models based on provenance, and to analyse
provenance. I will also discuss how provenance can help with reproducibility, in the context of scientific workflows developed for qualitative analysis in social sciences.

Bio

Luc Moreau is a Professor of Computer Science and Head of the Web and Internet Science group (WAIS), in the department Electronics and Computer Science (ECS) at the University of Southampton.

Luc was co-chair of the W3C Provenance Working Group, which resulted in four W3C Recommendations and nine W3C Notes, specifying PROV, a conceptual data model for provenance the Web, and its serializations in various Web languages. Previously, he initiated the successful Provenance Challenge series, which saw the involvement of over 20 institutions investigating provenance inter-operability in 3 successive challenges, and which resulted in the specification of the community Open Provenance Model (OPM).

IDC Seminar by Dr Cockcroft

June 14, 2016 at 11:00 am

Details to come.

IDC seminar on Co-design by Marianne Markowski (2 short talks)

March 22, 2016 at 11:00 am

Dr. Marianne Markowski

Marianne_Markowski2Short talk 1: Co-design, collaborative design or participatory design?

My short talk explores the different interpretations of the word co-design and how it can be understood in different contexts. The perspectives range from HCI, systems design, participatory design to innovative and transformative design perspectives. I further offer a view on the applicability of co-design from a UX practitioner perspective  and my personal definition of co-design, which I developed as a researcher researching with older people.

Short talk 2: Cross-disciplinary views of affective experiences through research skills development

This short talk constitutes a work-in-progress report of our activities in knowledge and skills development when examining affective experiences in online and offlinecultural encounters. The presentation will engage with the different understandings of disciplinary viewpoints around the topic and argue that ‘affective experiences’ are understood and researched in very diverse ways.

Bio

Marianne Markowski has recently completed her PhD studies into designing online social interaction for and with older people. Her practice-based investigation looked at design processes as well as creative design practice (e.g. Teletalker prototype). With her research she explored different forms of participant and researcher engagements.

She currently works as a freelance UX designer and researcher before joining University of Greenwich’s Centre for Positive Ageing as a research fellow.

Alongside academia Marianne has been working in user experience design and user research for over a decade. She has evaluated a wide range of software and platforms starting from kiosk, desktop, interactive television to mobile applications and handsets. She led and worked on UX projects B2C and B2B in the retail, banking, education, mobile and government sectors.

IDC seminar – Empowering people to tell their unique stories – The design of creative writing user interfaces

March 15, 2016 at 11:00 am

Dr. Pedro Campos (University of Madeira, Portugal and Madeira Interactive Technologies Institute)

http://www.m-iti.org/people/pedro

pedro-300x300

Creativity is an inspiration that many people have and always want more – but it is a complex and multifaceted phenomenon. In this talk I will briefly cover some design principles for creativity support tools as well as perspectives on creative interaction. I will focus on user interfaces for creative writing Creative writing is often used as a pedagogical tool to increase literacy. It can also be used to build positive relationships and encourage dialogue across diverse communities. Creative writing gives a voice to marginal groups in society, helping them to tell their stories. In this sense, new tools for creative writers can be used to support community-based writing projects and encourage people from all backgrounds to find their voice and tell their unique stories. But we also believe that creative writing can be used not only for the mental well-being of underserved populations but as a way to empower people to tell their unique stories and thereby increase society’s awareness of their situations and challenges.

Bio: Pedro Campos is an Assistant Professor at the University of Madeira, Portugal, and Senior Researcher of the Madeira Interactive Technologies Institute, where he served as Vice President from 2012-2015. He is also Associate Researcher at the Visualization and Intelligent Multimodal Interfaces Group at INESC-ID Lisbon. He is a founding member of IFIP’s Technical Committee 13.6 on Human Work Interaction Design, becoming elected as Chair for 2014-2017. He is also Portugal’s national representative at the TC13 and serves the editorial boards and program committees of several Human-Computer Interaction journals and conferences. He has authored more than fifty research papers and has lead or participated in several EU, national and regionally-funded scientific projects.

IDC seminar: Datathons – An Experience Report of Data Hackathons for Data Science Education

March 1, 2016 at 11:00 am

Dr. Craig Anslow (Middlesex University)

craig-anslowLarge amounts of data are becoming increasingly available through open data repositories as well as companies and governments collecting data to improve decision making and efficiencies. Consequently there is a need to increase the data literacy of computer science students. Data science is a relatively new area within computer science and the curriculum is rapidly evolving along with the tools required to perform analytics which students need to learn how to effectively use. To address the needs of students learning key data science and analytics skills we propose augmenting existing data science curriculums with hackathon events that focus on data also known as datathons. In this paper we present our experience at hosting and running four datathons that involved students and members from the community coming together to solve challenging problems with data from notfor-profit social good organizations and publicly open data. Our reported experience from our datathons will help inform other academics and community groups who also wish to host datathons to help facilitate their students and members to learn key data science and analytics skills.

This is a practice for the talk that Craig will give at the SIGCSE 2016 Conference:  http://sigcse2016.sigcse.org/

Bio

Craig Anslow is a senior postdoc fellow working on the FP7 VALCRI project.